2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

The principal accounting policies applied in the preparation of these consolidated financial statements are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated.

2.1 Basis of Preparation

These consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adopted within the European Union. These consolidated financial statements are in continuation to the special purpose financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2013. The financial statements are presented in euros (€). Amounts are shown in thousands of euros unless otherwise stated. The euro is the presentation currency of the Group. Preparing the financial statements in accordance with IFRS means that management is required to make assessments, estimates and assumptions that influence the application of regulations and the amounts reported for assets, equity, liabilities, commitments, income and expenses. The estimates made and the related assumptions are based on historical experience and various other factors, such as relevant knowledge, which are considered to be reasonable under the given circumstances. The IFRS financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention except for financial derivatives, long-term incentive plans and post-employment benefits. The estimates and assumptions serve as the basis for assessing the value of recognized assets and liabilities whose amounts cannot currently be determined from other sources. However, actual results may differ from the estimates. Estimates and underlying assumptions are subject to constant assessment. Changes in estimates and assumptions are recognized in the period in which the estimates are revised.

The areas involving higher degree of judgement or complexity, or areas where assumptions and estimates are significant to the consolidated financial statements are disclosed in note 4.

2.2 Changes in Accounting Policy and Disclosures

2.2.1 New and Amended Standards and Interpretations Adopted by the Group

The new and amended standards and interpretations effective for the current reporting period listed below have been adopted by the Group and implemented as of 1 January 2014 with retrospective application.

  • IAS 32, ‘Financial Instruments: Presentation,’ effective for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014. These amendments are to the application guidance in IAS 32, and clarify some of the requirements for offsetting financial assets and financial liabilities on the balance sheet. The amendments have no effect on the reporting of the Group.
  • IAS 36, ‘Impairment of Assets,’ effective for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014. This amendment addresses the disclosure of information about the recoverable amount of impaired assets if that amount is based on fair value less costs of disposal.  The amendment has no impact on the reporting of the Group.
  • IAS 39, ‘Novation of Derivatives,’ effective for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014. This amendment provides relief from discontinuing hedge accounting when novation of a hedging instrument to a central counter party meets specified criteria. The amendment has no effect on the reporting of the Group.

2.2.2 New Standards, Amendments and Interpretations Issued But Not Effective for the Reported Period and Not Adopted Early

A number of new standards and amendments to standards and interpretations are effective for annual periods beginning after 1 January 2014, and have not been applied in preparing these consolidated financial statements.  

The following standards, amendments and interpretations will be adopted by the Group at the moment they become effective:

  • IFRS 9, ‘Financial Instruments,’ effective date 1 January 2018. IFRS 9 is the first standard issued as part of a wider project to replace IAS 39. IFRS 9 retains but simplifies the mixed-measurement model and establishes two primary measurement categories for financial assets: amortized cost and fair value. The basis of classification depends on the entity’s business model and the contractual cash flow characteristics of the financial asset. The guidance in IAS 39 on impairment of financial assets and hedge accounting continues to apply. The standard is effective for accounting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2018. GrandVision will assess the impact over the following years.
  • IFRS 15, ‘Revenue from Contracts with Customers’ deals with revenue recognition and establishes principles for reporting information about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from an entity’s contracts with customers. Revenue is recognized when a customer obtains control and thus has the ability to direct the use and obtain the benefits. The standard is effective for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2017 and earlier application is permitted. The Group is assessing the impact of IFRS 15.

2.3 Group Accounting

2.3.1 Subsidiaries

Subsidiaries are those entities over which the Group has control. The Group controls an entity when the Group is exposed to, or has rights to, variable returns from its involvement with the entity and has the ability to affect those returns through its power over the entity. Subsidiaries are fully consolidated from the date on which control is transferred to the Group and are no longer consolidated from the date that control ceases. All intercompany transactions, balances and unrealized gains on transactions between Group companies are eliminated; unrealized losses are also eliminated.

Apollo-Optik Holding GmbH & Co. KG is included in the consolidated financial statements of GrandVision N.V. and takes advantage of the exemption provision of Section 264 b HGB for financial year 2014. The statutory duty to prepare consolidated financial statements and a group management report does not apply to the subgroup of Apollo-Optik Holding GmbH & Co. KG pursuant to Section 291 HGB in conjunction with Section 1 et seqq. KonBefrV because Apollo-Optik Holding GmbH & Co. KG and its subsidiaries are included in the consolidated financial statements of GrandVision N.V.

Apollo-Optik GmbH is included in the consolidated financial statements of GrandVision N.V. and takes advantage of the exemption provision of Section 264 (3) HGB for financial year 2014.

2.3.2 Business Combinations

The acquisition method of accounting is used to account for the acquisition of subsidiaries by the Group. The cost of an acquisition is measured as the fair value of the assets given, equity instruments issued and liabilities incurred or assumed at the date of exchange. Identifiable assets acquired, and liabilities and contingent liabilities assumed, in a business combination are measured initially at their fair values at the acquisition date, irrespective of the extent of any non-controlling interest. On an acquisition-by-acquisition basis, the Group recognizes any non-controlling interest in the acquired subsidiary either at fair value or at the non-controlling interest’s proportionate share of the acquired subsidiary’s net assets.

The excess of the consideration transferred, the amount of any non-controlling interest in the acquired subsidiary and the acquisition-date fair value of any previous equity interest in the acquired subsidiary over the fair value of the Group’s share of the identifiable net assets acquired are recorded as goodwill. If this is less than the fair value of the net assets of the subsidiary acquired, the difference is recognized directly in the Income Statement.

GrandVision applies the anticipated acquisition method where it has the right and the obligation to purchase any remaining non-controlling interest (so-called put/call arrangements). Under the anticipated acquisition method the interests of the non-controlling shareholder are derecognized when the Group’s liability relating to the purchase of its shares is recognized. The recognition of the financial liability implies that the interests subject to the purchase are deemed to have been acquired already. Therefore the corresponding interests are presented as already owned by the Group even though legally they are still non-controlling interests. The initial measurement of the fair value of the financial liability recognized by the Group forms part of the contingent consideration for the acquisition.

Any contingent consideration to be transferred by the Group is recognized at fair value at the acquisition date. Subsequent changes to the fair value of the contingent consideration that is deemed to be an asset or liability will be recognized in accordance with IAS 39 either in profit or loss or as a change to other comprehensive income. Contingent consideration that is classified as equity is not remeasured, and its subsequent settlement is accounted for in equity.

Acquisition-related expenses are taken into the Income Statement at the moment they are incurred.

2.3.3 Common Control Acquisitions

Acquisitions made by the Group, acquired from the parent company (HAL Holding), are treated as common control transactions and predecessor accounting is applied. Under predecessor accounting no purchase price allocation is performed. The acquired net assets are included in the GrandVision consolidation at carrying value as included in the consolidation of HAL Holding. The difference between the consideration transferred and the net assets is recognized in equity.

2.3.4 Transactions and Non-Controlling Interests

The transactions with non-controlling interests are accounted as transactions with equity holders of the Group. For purchases of non-controlling interests, the difference between any consideration paid and the relevant share acquired of the carrying value of the net assets of the subsidiary is deducted from equity. Gains or losses on disposals to non-controlling interests are also recorded in equity.

2.3.5 Associates

Associates are all entities over which the Group has significant influence but not control, generally accompanying a shareholding between 20% and 50% of the voting rights. Investment in associates is accounted for using the equity method and initially recognized at cost. The Group’s investment in associates includes goodwill identified on acquisition, net of any accumulated impairment loss.

The Group’s share of its associates’ post-acquisition results is recognized in the Income Statement, and its share of post-acquisition movements in other comprehensive income is recognized in other comprehensive income. The cumulative post-acquisition movements are adjusted against the carrying amount of the investment. When the Group’s share of losses in an associate equals or exceeds its interest in the associate, including any other unsecured receivables, the Group does not recognize further losses, unless it has incurred obligations or made payments on behalf of the associate.

Unrealized results on transactions between the Group and its associates are eliminated to the extent of the Group’s interest in the associates.

If the ownership interest in an associate is reduced but significant influence is retained, only a proportionate share of the amounts previously recognized in other comprehensive income is reclassified to profit or loss where appropriate.

The Group determines at each reporting date whether there is an objective evidence that an investment in the associate is impaired. If this is the case, the Group calculates the amount of impairment as the difference between the recoverable amount of the associate and its carrying value and recognizes the amount in ‘share of result of associates’ in the Income Statement.

2.3.6 Joint Ventures

Investments in joint arrangements are classified as either joint operations or joint ventures depending on the contractual rights and obligations of each investor. The Group’s interest in the joint arrangement in India is treated as an associate and accounted for at net equity value. For more details regarding the accounting treatment refer to note 2.3.5.

2.4 Foreign Currency

2.4.1 General

Items in the financial statements of the various Group companies are measured in the currency of the primary economic environment in which each entity operates (the functional currency). The consolidated financial statements are presented in euros (€), this being GrandVision’s presentation currency.

2.4.2 Transactions, Balances and Translation

Foreign currency transactions are translated into the functional currency using the exchange rates prevailing at the dates of the transactions or valuation where items are remeasured. Foreign exchange gains and losses resulting from the settlement of such transactions, and from the translation at year-end exchange rates of monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies, are recognized in the Income Statement, except when deferred in other comprehensive income as qualifying cash flow hedges.

Foreign currency results that relate to borrowings and cash and cash equivalents are presented in the Income Statement within the financial result. All other foreign exchange gains and losses are presented in the Income Statement under the operating result to which the foreign currency result relates.

2.4.3 Foreign Subsidiaries

The assets and liabilities of foreign subsidiaries, including goodwill and fair value adjustments arising on consolidation, are translated into the presentation currency at the exchange rate applicable at the balance sheet date. The income and expenses of foreign subsidiaries are translated into the presentation currency at rates approximate to the exchange rates applicable at the date of the transaction. Resulting exchange differences are recognized in other comprehensive income.

Goodwill and fair value adjustments arising on the acquisition of a foreign operation are treated as local currency assets and liabilities of the foreign entity and are translated at the closing rate.

2.5 Segmentation

An operating segment is defined as a component of the Company that engages in business activities from which it may earn revenues and incur expenses. Operating segments are reported in a manner consistent with the internal reporting provided to the chief operating decision-maker. These operating segments were defined based on geographic markets. All operating segments operate in optical retail and do not have additional lines of business or alternative sources of revenue from external customers other than optical retail. The operating segments are in line with the reporting segments. There has been no aggregation of operating segments into reporting segments. The operating segments’ operating result is reviewed regularly by the CEO and CFO (the Management Board) – together, the chief operating decision-maker – which makes decisions as to the resources to be allocated to the segments and assesses their performance, based on discrete financial information available.

The Company’s reportable segments are defined as follows:

  • G4
  • Other Europe
  • Latin America & Asia

2.6 Revenue Recognition

Revenue comprises the fair value of the consideration received or receivable for the sale of products or services in the ordinary course of the Group’s activities. Revenue is shown net of value-added tax, returns, rebates and discounts and after eliminating revenue within the Group.

The Group recognizes revenue when the amount of revenue can be reliably measured and it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the entity. The amount of revenue is not considered to be reliably measurable until all contingencies relating to the revenue have been resolved. The Group bases its estimates on historical results, taking into consideration the type of customer, the type of transaction and the specifics of each agreement.

The Group operates multiple chains of retail outlets for selling optical products including insurance related to these products. Revenue is recognized only when the earning process is complete. This means that any prepayments made by customers are not considered as revenues yet and should be accounted for as deferred income. The earning process is considered complete upon delivery to the customer. The moment of ordering by the customer is not a determining factor. Retail revenue is usually in cash or by debit or credit card. Insurance-related income is recognized based upon historical data regarding claim ratios and upon the duration of the insurance contracts.

Merchandise revenue mainly comprises sales to franchisees. The earning process is considered complete upon delivery to the franchisee and when the entity has transferred significant risks and rewards of ownership of the products to the buyer and does not retain continuing managerial involvement or control over the products sold.

Franchise royalty is recognized on an accrual basis in accordance with the substance of the relevant agreements.

Other revenues comprise supplier allowances and any other revenue. Supplier allowances are only recognized as revenue if there is no direct relationship with a purchase transaction; otherwise the supplier allowance is deducted from cost of revenue.

It is the Group’s policy to sell its products to the retail customer with a right to return. Experience is used to estimate and provide for such returns at the time of sale as described in note 2.22.3.

2.7 Customer Loyalty

The Group operates customer loyalty programs in several countries. In these programs customers accumulate points for purchases made or receive vouchers for rebates on future purchases. The reward points and vouchers are recognized as a separately identifiable component of the initial sale transaction by allocating the fair value of the consideration received between the award points or vouchers and the other components of the sale such that the reward points are initially recognized as deferred income at their fair value. Revenue from the reward points and vouchers is recognized when the points and vouchers are redeemed. Reward points and vouchers expire after a number of months after initial sales depending on each loyalty program.

2.8 Operating Lease

Leases where a significant portion of the risks and rewards of ownership are retained by the lessor are classified as operating leases. Payments made under operating leases are charged to the Income Statement on a straight-line basis over the period of the lease.

2.9 Financial Income

Financial income comprises interest received on outstanding monies and upward adjustments to the fair value, interest result of foreign currency derivatives and net foreign exchange results.

2.10 Financial Costs

Financial costs comprise interest due on funds drawn, calculated using the effective interest method, downward adjustments to the fair value and realized value of derivative financial instruments, other interest paid, commitment fees, the amortization of transaction fees related to borrowings and net foreign exchange results.

2.11 Property, Plant and Equipment

Property, plant and equipment is stated at historical cost less depreciation. Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method to write off the cost of each asset to its residual value over its estimated useful life.

Useful lives used are:

Buildings

30 years

Leasehold and building improvements

5 – 10 years

Machinery

6 – 10 years

Furniture and fixtures

7 – 10 years

Other equipment

5 – 7 years

Computer and telecom equipment

4 – 5 years

Vehicles

5 years

The useful lives and the residual values of the assets are subject to an annual review.

Where the carrying amount of an asset is higher than its estimated recoverable amount, it is written down immediately to its recoverable amount. Gains and losses on disposals are determined by comparing proceeds with the carrying amount and are included in the operating result under the relevant heading. Subsequent costs are included in the asset’s carrying amount or recognized as a separate asset, as appropriate, only when it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the Group and the cost of the item can be measured reliably. All other repairs and maintenance are charged to the Income Statement during the financial period in which they are incurred.

Property, plant and equipment acquired via a financial lease is carried at the lower of fair value and the present value of the minimum required lease payments at the start of the lease, less cumulative depreciation and impairment (see note 2.14). Lease payments are recognized in accordance with note 2.19. The property, plant and equipment acquired under finance leases is depreciated over the shorter of the useful life of the asset and the lease term.

2.12 Goodwill

Goodwill arises from the acquisition of subsidiaries and represents the excess of the consideration transferred over the fair value of the Company’s share of the net identifiable assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities of the acquired investment in an associate or subsidiary at the date of obtaining control. For the purpose of impairment testing, goodwill is allocated to those groups of cash-generating units expected to benefit from the acquisition. Each of those group of cash-generating units represents the Group’s investment in a country or group of countries, which is the lowest level at which the goodwill is monitored for internal management purposes. Goodwill is not amortized but is subject to annual impairment testing (note 2.14). Any impairment is recognized immediately as an expense and is not subsequently reversed.

Any negative goodwill resulting from acquisitions is recognized directly in the Income Statement.

If an entity is divested, the carrying amount of its goodwill is recognized in the Income Statement. If the divestment concerns part of a group of cash-generating units, the amount of goodwill written off and recognized in income is determined on the basis of the relative value of the part divested compared to the value of the group of cash-generating units. Goodwill directly attributable to the divested unit is written off and recognized in the Income Statement.

2.13 Other Intangible Assets

2.13.1 Software

Acquired software is capitalized on the basis of the costs incurred to acquire and to bring to use the specific software. Software is amortized when the product is put in operation and charged to the Income Statement using the straight-line method, based on an estimated useful life of 5 years.

Costs incurred on development projects (i.e. internally developed software) are recognized as an intangible asset when the following criteria are met:

  • It is technically feasible to complete the product so that it will be available for use;
  • Management intends to complete the product and use it;
  • The product can be used;
  • It can be demonstrated how the product will generate probable future economic benefits;
  • Adequate technical, financial and other resources to complete development and use the product are available;
  • The expenditure attributable to the software product during its development can be reliably measured.

The project expenditure that is capitalized includes purchase prices and the directly attributable employee costs. Development costs previously recognized as an expense are not recognized as an asset in a subsequent period.

2.13.2 Key Money & Rights of Use

Key money represents expenditure associated with acquiring existing operating lease agreements for company-operated stores (‘key money’) in countries where there is an active market for key money (e.g. regularly published transaction prices), also referred to as ‘rights of use’. Key money is not amortized but annually tested for impairment. Key money paid to previous tenants in countries where there is not an active market for key money, and key money paid to landlords (i.e. in the case of operating leases), is recognized as prepaid rent within other non-current assets and the short-term amount in trade and other receivables and amortized over the contractual lease period.

2.13.3 Trademarks

Trademarks are initially recognized at fair value using the relief-from-royalty approach. The fair value is subsequently regarded as cost. Trademarks have a finite useful life and are carried at cost less accumulated amortization. Amortization is calculated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life but not longer than 15 years.

2.13.4 Customer Database

Customer databases are only recognized as an intangible asset if the Company has a practice of establishing relationships with its customers and when the Company is able to sell or transfer the customer database to a third party. The customer databases are initially recognized at fair value using the discounted cash flow method. The fair value is subsequently regarded as cost. Customer databases have a finite useful life and are carried at cost less accumulated amortization. Amortization is calculated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life but no longer than 15 years.

2.13.5 Reacquired Rights

As part of a business combination, an acquirer may acquire a right that it had previously granted to the acquiree to use one or more of the acquirer’s recognized or unrecognized assets. Examples of such rights include a right to use the acquirer’s trade name under a franchise agreement. A reacquired right is an identifiable intangible asset that the acquirer recognizes separately from goodwill. Also, a right or an obligation disappearing because of a business combination is a reacquired right and is recognized separately from goodwill in a business combination. Reacquired rights are initially valued at the present value of the future expected future cash flows, which is subsequently used as cost and amortized on a straight-line basis over its useful life, being the remaining contractual period, but not exceeding 10 years.

2.13.6 Franchise Contracts

Franchise contracts acquired in a business combination are initially valued at fair value, being the present value of the estimated future cash flows, which is subsequently used as cost and amortized on a straight line basis over its useful life, being the remaining duration of the franchise contract but not exceeding 10 years.

2.14 Impairment of Non-Financial Assets

Assets that have an indefinite useful life are not subject to amortization and are tested annually for impairment. Assets that are subject to amortization are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. An impairment loss is recognized for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is determined using the discounted cash flow method applying a discount factor derived from the average cost of capital. If the discounted cash flow method results in a lower value than the carrying value, the recoverable amount is determined by the fair value less costs of disposal, which is determined by a multiple on the average sales of the last three years. The multiple is based on peers of GrandVision and/or recent market transactions, taking into account risk factors of the CGU for which the fair value less costs of disposal is calculated.

For the purposes of assessing impairment, assets are grouped at the lowest levels for which there are separately identifiable cash flows (cash-generating units). Non-financial assets other than goodwill that suffered impairment are reviewed for possible reversal of the impairment at each reporting date.

Impairments are recognized in the Income Statement. Impairment recognized in respect of cash-generating units is first allocated to goodwill and then to other assets of the cash-generating unit on a pro rata basis based on the carrying amount of each asset in the cash-generating unit.

2.15 Financial Instruments

Financial assets

The Group classifies its financial assets in the following categories: at fair value through profit or loss; loans and receivables. The classification depends on the purpose for which the financial assets were acquired. Management determines the classification of its financial assets at initial recognition and assesses the designation at every reporting date.

Trade and other receivables are recognized initially at fair value. A provision for impairment of trade and other receivables is established when there is objective evidence that the Group will not be able to collect all amounts due according to the original terms of the receivables. The amount of the provision is the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows, discounted at the original effective interest rate. The provision is recognized in the Income Statement within selling and marketing costs. When a receivable is uncollectible, it is written off against the allowance account for trade receivables. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against selling and marketing costs in the Income Statement.

Loans and receivables

Loans and receivables are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market. Initial recognition of loans is at fair value; subsequently the loans are stated at amortized costs using the effective interest method.

The Group has granted loans to certain members of the management of the Group and to management of the subsidiaries. The loans are secured by pledges on the shares held by management. The applied interest rates are based on effective interest rates. The net receivable is initially recognized at fair value; subsequently the receivable is stated using the effective interest method, which equals the nominal interest. The amount of the provision is the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows, discounted at the effective interest rate.

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss are financial assets held for trading. A financial asset is classified in this category if acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the short term. Derivatives are also categorized as held for trading unless they are designated as hedges. Shareholdings in commercial centers where stores are operated are also classified under this category.

Shareholdings

The Company owns certain limited shareholdings in commercial centers or buildings where the Company is operating stores. These shareholdings are accounted for against fair value, based on recent transactions. A change in the fair value is recognized in the Income Statement.

Impairment of financial assets

The Group assesses at the end of each reporting period whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. A financial asset or a group of financial assets is impaired and impairment losses are incurred only if there is objective evidence of impairment as a result of one or more events that occurred after the initial recognition of the asset (a ‘loss event’) and that the loss event has an impact on the estimated future cash flows of the financial asset or group of financial assets that can be reliably estimated.

For the ‘loans and receivables’ category, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows (excluding credit losses that have not been incurred) discounted at the financial asset’s original effective interest rate. If, in a subsequent period, the amount of the impairment loss decreases and the decrease can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was recognized, the reversal of the previously recognized impairment loss is recognized in the consolidated income statement.

Financial liabilities

Derivative financial instruments

A derivative is a financial instrument or other contract with all three of the following characteristics:

  1. its value changes in response to a change in other variables such as a specified interest rate or a foreign exchange rate; and
  2. it requires no initial net investment or an initial net investment that is significantly smaller than the value of the underlying notional amount; and
  3. it is settled at a future date. Derivatives are initially recognized at fair value (based on external valuation performed by financial institutions or other valuation techniques) on the date a derivative contract is entered into, and are subsequently remeasured at their fair value based on external valuations performed by financial institutions or other valuation techniques such as mathematical models (Black-Scholes).

The method of recognizing the resulting gain or loss depends on whether the derivative is designated as a hedging instrument, and, if so, the nature of the item being hedged.

The Group uses derivative financial instruments principally in the management of its interest and foreign currency cash flow risks. Applying IAS 39, the Group measures all derivative financial instruments based on fair values derived from external quotes of the instruments.

Derivative financial instruments are initially recognized in the balance sheet at fair value on the date a derivative contract is entered into (trade date) and are subsequently remeasured at their fair value.

Hedge accounting

The Company designates certain derivatives as either:

  1. hedges of highly probable forecast transactions (cash flow hedges);
  2. hedges of the fair value of recognized assets and liabilities or a firm commitment (fair value hedges).

The Company documents, at the inception of the transaction, the relationship between hedging instruments and hedged items, as well as its risk management objective and strategy for undertaking various hedge transactions. The Company also documents its assessment, both at hedge inception and on an ongoing basis, of whether the derivatives that are being used in hedging transactions are highly effective in offsetting changes in cash flows of hedged items.

Cash flow hedge

The highly effective portion of changes in the fair value of derivatives that are designated and qualify as cash flow hedges is recognized in other comprehensive income. The gain or loss relating to the ineffective portion is recognized immediately in the consolidated statement of income. Amounts accumulated in equity are recycled in the consolidated statement of income in the periods when the hedged item affects profit or loss. However, when the projected transaction that is hedged results in the recognition of a non-financial asset (for example inventory) or a liability, the gains and losses previously deferred in shareholders’ equity are transferred from equity and included in the initial measurement of the cost of the asset or liability. When a hedging instrument expires or is sold, or when a hedge no longer meets the criteria for hedge accounting, any cumulative gain or loss existing in equity at that time remains in equity and is recognized when the projected transaction is ultimately recognized in the consolidated statement of income. When a projected transaction is no longer expected to occur, the cumulative gain or loss that was reported in shareholders’ equity is immediately transferred to the consolidated statement of income in ‘financial costs’. For the movements in the cash flow hedge refer to the consolidated statement of changes in shareholders’ equity.

Fair value hedge

Changes in the fair value of derivatives that are designated and qualify as fair value hedges are recorded in the consolidated statement of income as financial costs, together with any changes in the fair value of the hedged asset or liability that are attributable to the hedged risk. The fair value of financial instruments that are not traded in an active market (for example, over-the-counter derivatives) is determined by using valuation techniques. The Company uses its judgment to select a variety of methods and makes assumptions that are mainly based on market conditions existing at each statement of financial position date. Certain derivative instruments do not qualify for hedge accounting. Changes in the fair value of any derivative instruments that do not qualify for hedge accounting are recognized immediately in the consolidated statement of income as financial costs.

On the date a derivative contract is entered into, the Group designates interest rate swaps or foreign currency swaps and options (hedge instruments) as a hedge of the exposure to the fluctuations in the variable interest rates on borrowings or foreign currency rates on transactions (hedged items).

When it is determined that a derivative is not highly effective as a hedge or that it has ceased to be a highly effective hedge, the Group discontinues hedge accounting prospectively. Any ineffectiveness is recognized in the Income Statement.

Interest payments and receipts arising from interest rate derivatives such as interest rate swaps are matched to those arising from the underlying debt. Payments made or received in respect of the early termination of interest rate derivatives are spread over the term of the originally hedged borrowing so long as the underlying exposure continues to exist and are matched with the interest payments on the underlying borrowing.

The fair values of derivative instruments used for hedging purposes are disclosed in note 30. Movements on the hedging reserve are shown in other comprehensive income. The full fair value of a hedging derivative is classified as a non-current asset or liability when the remaining maturity of the hedged item is more than 12 months. It is classified as current asset or liability when the remaining maturity of the hedged item is less than 12 months.

Borrowings

Borrowings are initially recognized at fair value, net of transaction costs incurred, and subsequently recognized at amortized cost. Any difference between the proceeds (net of transaction costs) and the redemption value is recognized in the Income Statement during the term of the borrowing using the effective interest method. Borrowings are classified as current liabilities unless the Group has an unconditional right to postpone settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the balance sheet date.

2.16 Inventories

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost and net realizable value. Cost is determined by the weighted average cost method. Net realizable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business, less applicable variable selling expenses. Costs of inventories include the transfer from equity of any gains and losses on qualifying cash flow hedges on purchases of inventories.

2.17 Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents comprise bank balances, which are available on demand and are carried in the balance sheet at face value. For the purposes of the cash flow statement, cash and cash equivalents comprise cash on hand, deposits held at call with banks, other short-term highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less, and bank overdrafts. In the balance sheet, bank overdrafts are included in borrowings in current liabilities.

The cash pooling agreement is reported as a net amount as there is a legally enforceable right to offset and an intention to settle on a net basis the debit and credit cash positions in different countries and currencies.

2.18 Share Capital

Ordinary shares are classified as equity attributable to equity holders. Costs directly connected to the issuance of new shares are deducted from the proceeds and recognized in equity.

Where the Company or its subsidiaries purchase the Company’s equity share capital, the consideration paid, including any attributable transaction costs net of income taxes, is deducted from total shareholders’ equity as treasury shares until they are canceled. Where such shares are subsequently sold or reissued, any consideration received, net of transaction costs, is included in shareholders’ equity.

Dividends on ordinary and priority shares are recognized in equity in the reporting period in which they are declared.

2.19 Financial Leases

Lease contracts whereby the risks and rewards associated with the ownership lie wholly or primarily with the lessee are classified as financial leases. The minimum lease payments are recognized partly as financial costs and partly as settlement of the outstanding liability. The financial costs are charged to each period in the total lease period so as to produce a constant, regular interest rate on the outstanding balance of the liability. The interest element of the financial costs is charged to the Income Statement over the lease period.

The corresponding rental obligations, net of financial costs, are classified as current liabilities unless the Group has an unconditional right to postpone settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the balance sheet date.

2.20 Current and Deferred Income Taxes

The tax expense for the period comprises current and deferred tax. Tax is recognized in the Income Statement, except to the extent that it relates to items recognized in other comprehensive income or directly in equity. In this case, the tax is also recognized in other comprehensive income or directly in equity, respectively.

The current income tax charge is calculated on the basis of the tax laws enacted or substantively enacted at the balance sheet date in the countries where the Company and its subsidiaries operate and generate taxable income. Management periodically evaluates positions taken in tax returns with respect to situations in which applicable tax regulation is subject to interpretation. It establishes provisions where appropriate on the basis of amounts expected to be paid to the tax authorities.

Deferred income tax is recognized, using the liability method, on temporary differences arising between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts in the consolidated financial statements. However, deferred tax liabilities are not recognized if they arise from the initial recognition of goodwill; deferred income tax is not accounted for if it arises from the initial recognition of an asset or liability in a transaction other than a business combination that, at the time of the transaction, affects neither accounting nor taxable profit or loss. Deferred income tax is determined using tax rates (and laws) that have been enacted or substantially enacted by the balance sheet date and are expected to apply when the related deferred income tax asset is realized or the deferred income tax liability is settled.

Deferred income tax assets are recognized for loss carryforward to the extent that realization of the related tax benefit through the future taxable profits is probable. The Group assumes future taxable profits to be probable if a taxable entity has been profitable for two consecutive years and it is expected to maintain its profitability in future.

Deferred income tax is provided on temporary differences arising on investments in subsidiaries and associates, except for deferred income tax liability where the timing of the reversal of the temporary difference is controlled by the Group and it is probable that the temporary difference will not reverse in the foreseeable future.

Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are offset when there is a legally enforceable right to offset current tax assets against current tax liabilities and when the deferred income tax assets and liabilities relate to income taxes levied by the same taxation authority on either the same taxable entity or different taxable entities where there is an intention to settle the balances on a net basis.

2.21 Employee Benefits

2.21.1 Pension Obligations

The Group operates various post-employment schemes, including both defined benefit and defined contribution plans as well as post-employment medical plans.

A defined contribution plan is a post-employment benefit plan under which the Group pays fixed contributions into a separate entity. The Group has no legal or constructive obligations to pay further contributions if the fund does not hold sufficient assets to pay all employees the benefits relating to employee service in the current and prior periods. A defined benefit plan is a post-employment benefit plan that is not a defined contribution plan. Typically defined benefit plans define an amount of pension benefit that an employee will receive on retirement, usually dependent on one or more factors such as age, years of service and compensation. 

The liability in respect of defined benefit pension plans is the present value of the defined benefit of obligations at the balance sheet date minus the fair value of plan assets, together with adjustments for actuarial gains/losses and past service costs. The defined benefit obligation is calculated annually by independent actuaries using the projected unit credit method. The present value of the defined benefit obligation is determined by the estimated future cash outflows using the interest rates of high-quality corporate bonds that are denominated in the currency in which the benefits will be paid and which have terms of maturity approximating the terms of the related pension obligation.

The Group operates defined benefit plans in France, the Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Italy, Greece and Mexico. In the Netherlands the assets are held in separately administered funds. The pension plans are funded by payments by the relevant Group companies and partly by the employees (in the case of the Netherlands), taking account of the recommendations of independent qualified actuaries. Actuarial gains and losses related to both defined benefit obligations and fair value of plan assets arising from experience adjustments and changes in actuarial assumptions are charged or credited to equity in other comprehensive income in the period in which they arise. Past service costs are recognized immediately in the Income Statement.

In a number of countries the Groups runs defined contribution plans. The contributions are recognized as employee benefit expense when they are due. The Group has no further payment obligations once the contributions have been paid.

2.21.2 Other Post-Employment Obligations

Some countries provide post-employment healthcare benefits to their retirees. The entitlement to these benefits is conditional on the employee remaining in service up to retirement age and includes the estimation that (former) employees will make use of this arrangement. The expected costs of these benefits are accrued over the period of employment using the same accounting methodology as used for the defined benefit pension plans.

2.21.3 Long-Term Incentive Plans

Certain members of the senior management are rewarded with long-term incentive plans (LTIPs). The Group operates two long-term incentive plans.

Real share plan

The real share plan provides for the purchase of shares in the Company by eligible participants which are subject to a vesting term and requires the Company to make an offer to redeem 50% of the shares after a certain period of time, typically four years, and another offer to redeem the remaining 50% of the shares on the fifth-year anniversary of grant date. However, these redemption options were canceled upon listing of the Company’s shares and the plan has been classified as an equity-settled share-based payment arrangement under IFRS 2 (note 28) instead of other long-term employee benefits recognized within the scope of IAS 19. Vesting of awards made under the real share plan is subject to a service condition that can vary between 3-5 years following the date of grant. Expense is recognized over the vesting period and includes estimates for the number of shares that are expected to vest.

Phantom plan

The phantom plan provides eligible participants with the right to receive cash based on the appreciation in the Company’s share price between the date of grant and the vesting date. Under the phantom plan, such eligible participants are granted a combination of phantom shares and phantom options. Phantom shares and phantom options are settled in cash and contain a service condition of 3-5 years and can contain in addition performance conditions based on the results of certain predetermined Company-related financial performance targets of respective business units in the organization which are treated as non-market vesting conditions. Under IFRS 2, for cash-settled share-based payment transactions, the fair value of the liability for the awards made is remeasured at each reporting date and at the settlement date. The fair value is recognized over the vesting period. The amount of expense recognized takes into account the best available estimate of the number of equity instruments expected to vest under the service and performance conditions underlying each phantom share and phantom option granted.

The estimate for the liability (and corresponding expense recognition) is affected by the probability of a listing since the estimated fair value of the Company’s shares is higher than the value of the shares determined based on the internal fixed valuation measure used before application of IFRS 2 (note 28) and was recognized as ‘other long-term employee benefits’ within the scope of IAS 19. The best estimate of a listing occurring has been updated at each reporting period with changes to the liability recognized through the Income Statement.

Earn out obligations

The Group also has earn out obligations on the interests held by management of the subsidiaries in the subsidiaries. These non-controlling interests are recognized as financial liabilities in the balance sheet. Changes in the value of these non-controlling interests held by managements of the subsidiaries are recognized in the Income Statement.

2.22 Provisions

2.22.1 General

Provisions are recognized when the Group has a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of past events, it is probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation, and a reliable estimate of the amount can be made. Provisions are measured at the present value of the expenditures expected to be required to settle the obligation using a pre-tax rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the obligation. The increase in the provision due to the passage of time is recognized as interest expense.

Provisions are classified as current liabilities unless the Group has an unconditional right to postpone settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the balance sheet date. Provisions are not recognized for future operating losses.

2.22.2 Employee-Related Provisions

Termination benefits are payable when employment is terminated by the Group before the normal retirement date, or whenever an employee accepts voluntary redundancy in exchange for these benefits. The Group recognizes termination benefits when it is demonstrably committed to a termination when the entity has a detailed formal plan to terminate the employment of current employees without possibility of withdrawal. In the case of an offer made to encourage voluntary redundancy, the termination benefits are measured based on the number of employees expected to accept the offer. Benefits falling due more than 12 months after the end of the reporting period are discounted to their present value.

2.22.3 Warranty Provision

Provisions for the right of return are classified as warranty provisions. The provision is based on past experience and future expectations of warranty claims. Warranty costs are recognized in the Income Statement under cost of sales and direct related expenses.

2.22.4 Other Provisions

Other provisions are mainly related to restructruring provisions, guarantee provisions and legal claims which are valued at the present value of the expected cash outflow.

Restructuring provisions comprise lease termination penalties, future lease payments for closed stores and offices, and employee termination payments. Restructuring expenses due more than 12 months after the end of the reporting period are discounted to their present value.

Bank borrowings to franchisers of the Group are often secured by a guarantee given by the Group to the bank. The guarantees given are secured by the activities, store rental contracts, the inventories and store furniture of the franchisers. When a cash outflow is likely, a provision is formed, being the present value of the expected cash outflow. If a cash outflow is not likely, the guarantee is included in the contingent liabilities.

2.23 Trade Payables

Trade payables are obligations to pay for goods or services that have been acquired from suppliers in the ordinary course of business. Trade payables are classified as current liabilities if payment is due within one year or less. If not, they are presented as non-current liabilities.

Trade payables are recognized initially at fair value and subsequently measured at amortized cost using the effective interest method.

2.24 Principles for the Statement of Cash Flows

The statement of cash flows is compiled using the indirect method. The statement of cash flows distinguishes between cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities. Cash flows in foreign currencies are translated at the rate at the transaction date. Income and expenditure before income tax on profit are recognized as cash flows from operating activities. Interest paid and received is included under cash flow from financing activities. Cash flows arising from the acquisition or disposal of financial interests (subsidiaries and participating interests) are recognized as cash flows from investing activities, taking into account any cash and cash equivalents in these interests. Dividends paid out are recognized as cash flows from financing activities.